LINUS TWIZELL – THE SHOT I NEVER FORGOT

I am really delighted to present this latest shot to you, as it highlights an interesting point that I frequently find myself saying to my students and others in conversations.  Linus sent me this image and his email read “I don’t know if you’re taking submissions from non-professionals, or just uneducated amateurs…”

Well…a great image is a great image – it doesn’t matter what it is taken on, how it is taken or the level of perceived knowledge the photographer has. Photographers and artists have a habit of getting to weighed down in these discussions, where the most important thing is surely an image in its own right?

I was at a talk by Martin Parr the other day who suggested that you have to continuously take bad photographs to be able to identify a good one.  He said that he takes thousands more bad shots than good ones to this day.

The point being, we all take good shots…we all take bad shots – it is which images we choose to share that is significant and that is one of the main concepts behind ‘The Shot I Never Forgot’.

So Linus – I am more than happy to include your image, because it is a great shot and thank you for sharing it with us.

LINUS TWIZELL – THE SHOT I NEVER FORGOT

LINUS TWIZELL - THE SHOT I NEVER FORGOT (2006)

LINUS TWIZELL – THE SHOT I NEVER FORGOT (2006)

I took this candid with a 210mm lens on a summer’s evening in New York in August 2006, just as summer was starting to fade a little. I was there on a work visit and only had a very short period of time to myself so I didn’t get to explore anywhere near as much of the city as I liked.

I tend towards the architectural and landscape in my photography (strictly a hobby, so I won’t call it “my work”), but I came across the chap watching the sunset by the Statue of Liberty utterly oblivious to the joggers and commuters around him and couldn’t resist the shot.

It remains one of the very few images I’ve ever made significant digital “enhancement” to (beyond levels and cropping), removing a particularly poorly positioned girder from the top right of the frame – something I still agonise over to this day. I’ve often wondered what was going through the man’s mind as he contemplated Lady Liberty that evening, and have probably projected grander notions of freedom and national identity on the image than the reality would sustain, but for that reason he remains my own Mona Lisa and the Shot I Never Forgot.

 

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